Kitchen Remodel: Part 9 — Windows

The kitchen windows were in need of repair. One of the two windows had a crack running through the glass and the glazing was falling out of both windows. I removed both window frames and moved them to the shop to work on. I removed the glazing and the glass. I striped the paint from the inside of the frame with a heat gun. To put the new glass in, I first laid down a small bead of glazing on the frame. I set the glass into this glazing and pushed it into place. Next, I pushed glazing points into place to hold the glass in place. I used three on a side. Then I ran glazing over the glazing points to form the outside of the window. I reinstalled the window frames and added new hardware. I filmed this using only natural light.

Kitchen videos

Kitchen Remodel: Part 1 — Introduction

Kitchen Remodel: Part 1.5 — Storage Cart for Stove

Kitchen Remodel: Part 2 — Demolition

Kitchen Remodel: Part 2.5 — Wall hung shelf.

Kitchen Remodel: Part 3 — All about that base

Kitchen Remodel: Part 4 — Cabinet Carcass

Motorized Stop Motion Dolly

Kitchen Remodel: Part 5 — Drawers

Kitchen Remodel: Part 6 — cabinet tops

Kitchen Remodel: Part 7 — Plastering and Painting

Kitchen Remodel: Part 8 — Cabinet Install
http://youtu.be/ow715tPUZPk

49 ответов на “Kitchen Remodel: Part 9 — Windows”

  1. Hi Frank,
    how is the climate at your hometown? I´m very supprised to see singled glazed windows. Here in Germany you have to use double glazed windows as a minimum requirement for new buildings since decades. If you want to gather cheap credits you have to reduce your engergy consumption for heating so much, you will nedd triple glazed windows. Winter can have -20°C / 0°F.

    Rudi

  2. Great video as always. For cleaning your windows, use Invisible Glass instead of Windex and you'll get a perfect result every time. It is a great product, I use it on my cars, house, and everything else: http://amzn.com/B0007OWD2M

  3. Frank, as always your videos are entertaining.  A tip I learned from a professional window cleaner:  Dump the Windex.  Uses distilled water with a bit of liquid dishwashing soap added.  Works wonders and is way cheaper than Windex.

  4. If you use microfiber cloths instead of paper towels to clean the windows, you wont have any streaks. They'll actually pick up all of the dirt and grease off of the surface with just a bit of water, instead of smearing it around like the paper towels do. Super cheap for a lot of them on amazon: http://amzn.com/B0031B4YU2

  5. Excellent as always — tip from my mom — I was blown away that it works; 

    Cleaning glass, if forced to do it in sunlight like you were, don't use windex, it streaks no matter what.  Hit it with plain white vinegar on a crumpled up black and white newspaper.  Newsprint works amazingly.

  6. I use crumbled newspaper for cleaning my windows. First spray, remove most with a cloth and then dry it with newspaper. I scrub with a circular motion and it seems to leave no streaks at all.

  7. Frank — Im a massive Fan of your clips and you as a person 🙂
    ps first ever comment on youtube…
    I actually really like the fact that you leave and restore original parts of the house in this case the windows. If you wanted a new house where everything was straight and perfect, im sure you would live in such house.

  8. It is good to see real world home renovation and repair.  Sure, replacing the entire window with a more energy efficient double pane unit would be nice, but not everyone has the budget for this.  TV reno shows with extravagent budgets have "taught" us to remodel by tearing out and throwing away old materials, but this is not the only way to do the job.  Thank you Frank for reminding us how to complete the task in an economic and efficient fashion.  Well done!

  9. Frank, great video as always.  Strong suggestion from a guy who doesn't mind doing windows: $10 spent on a set of squeegee and soft window cleaner attachments will last for years, and make the window cleaning process not only better, but almost enjoyable.
    .

  10. Thanks Frank. Good stuff as always. I must ask though: Why do so many North American woodworkers use phillips screws? I find them very annoying, and even have a woodshop policy of throwing any out that I find, and replacing them with Torx…

  11. Frank — can you do a very brief, close-up segment on your awning window hinges? I am fixing up some awning style saches in my basement and I want to switch out hinges but not sure what ones will be best. Any help from the master himself would be much appreciated!

  12. The trick with the old style putty is to just get a lump of it in your hand and then work it in with your thumb to force fill the fillet. Get it roughly to shape with a putty knife, and then use an old paint brush to smooth it out. Works a treat!

  13. Know this comment is really late but the information can be used by many if they don't already know but when cleaning windows/glass and sometimes even chrome I always use window cleaner and instead of a rag/cloth use newspaper. It's the best thing I ever did.

  14. Its so inspiring how you remodeled your kitchen basically all on your own! I grew up where i was taught to just buy and replace but it can be so costly and less of what you want. This is amazing i hope i can learn to wood work one day so I can model my house the way i want to. Thank you for inspiring your production is beautiful and your content is A1!

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